A plague on both your houses …

BH The Black Death 2‘When ignorant men are overwhelmed by forces totally beyond their control and their understanding it is inevitable that they will search for some explanation within their grasp.  When they are frightened and badly hurt then they will seek someone on whom they can be revenged. […]  What was needed, therefore, was a suitable target for the indignation of the people, preferably a minority group, easily identifiable, already unpopular, widely scattered and lacking any powerful protector.’

Philip Ziegler, The Black Death, (The Folio Society, London: 1997)  Cover image:  Francis Mosley

The plague was too immediate, too visceral, for Shakespeare to include more than a passing reference to it in his plays.  In Romeo and Juliet it’s a factor in the tragedy, but at a safe distance.

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Saturday Night’s Alright (for Fighting)

BH Elizabethan Underworld

‘Elizabethan London was livelier, noisier, smellier, probably more dangerous and certainly more colourful than the city we know today.’  

Gamino Salgãdo, The Elizabethan Underworld, (The Folio Society, London: 2006)

Just another Saturday night at The Boar’s Head, Eastcheap?

I needed cheering after going back to school today at the end of the Easter Holidays.  And, look what I collected from the Post Office on the way home …

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Boar’s Head Bookshelf update

The bookshelf has had another update … this is the sort of thing that floats my boat on evenings when I don’t have urgent schoolwork to do; the sort of thing that makes pupils look aghast when they ask what I do with my life instead of watching TV! 

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Beat the Teacher (part 1)

bh-beat-the-teacher-big_0

I know this; and thus I challenge it. (Henry V)

How do you get a bunch of giddy Year 8s to do some ‘proper’ contextual research for HW, rather than just ripping stuff off Wikipedia, printing it without actually reading it?

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A little bedtime reading …

the man might take as long as a quarter of an hour to expire

Currently reading the wonderfully cheery Hangmen of England, by Brian Bailey (WH Allen, 1989). Whilst reflecting on what fun dinner-time conversation with ‘Uncle Bill’ must have been as he researched the book, I chanced upon this little gem about Tudor executions:

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