Pay it forward, Will …

If we paid something forwards, maybe especially Shakespeare, once in a while, the world would be a better place …

BH 150It’s hard to believe this is post 150 at The Boar’s Head.

Google ‘150’ and the images aren’t especially inspiring, unless you are Canadian, it seems.  This one – representing the 150 million horny spiders invading the homes we warm up as autumn approaches (according to Metro.co.uk) – is only here because I’m an arachnophobe.

But 150 is an important number for me …

Continue reading “Pay it forward, Will …”

Crimes Against Shakespeare 008

WE CANNOT, MUST NOT, WIPE ART WITH ANTI-BACTERIAL WIPES BEFORE ALLOWING THE NEXT GENERATION TO HANDLE IT …

BH CSF blinding of Gloucester
‘Out, vile jelly’:  the blinding of Gloucester …

I took this picture – from King Lear – at the Cambridge Shakespeare Festival back in 2012.  I often show it to pupils who try to tell me that Shakespeare is ‘boring‘.  Or indeed I give them some of the plot details from Titus Andronicus that have caused such concern of late …

It’s taken me a little while to allow this one to sink in to the extent that it became a ‘crime’, but in the Dock, ladies and gentlemen of the Jury, I give you no less than the English Faculty of Cambridge University (or at least some members of that august institution) …

Continue reading “Crimes Against Shakespeare 008”

My Favourite Shakespeare Infographs

I’m a big fan of infographics, and these are great. Personally, I’d reverse the order, because who doesn’t enjoy a Shakespearean pie-chart (unless of course your name is Demetrius or Chiron)?

The Bard and the Bible

You know what an infograph (or infographic) is, right? It’s a chart or other visual depiction of information that is intended to be consumed and understood quickly. There are all kinds, from maps to timelines and more. Some of my favorites, of course, are Shakespeare infographs. Here are three of the many I’ve “clipped” and saved:

3a8307f6bb01311fc90478857d32e891

My friend (and occasional guest blogger here at The Bard and the Bible) Sue sent this one to me:

16f34159f1b86710dfaa8c6457d215a2

And this is one of many efforts to chart the various causes of death in Shakespeare’s plays:

DF1rA96UMAA_cTG

View original post

Lend me your ears: support Drew Dzwonkowski’s ‘foolish’ side project …

BH caesarweb
(C) Drew Dzwonkowski

A running theme in the play is how Caesar’s assassination is going to be remembered and reenacted for centuries to come, so I drew the swimmers in modern clothes.

I had a ‘tense’ conversation with a Y10 lad today.  He has about a week to work on a 5-minute or so presentation.  The subject is entirely open to him, but it ought to be something he has sufficient interest in that he can produce a structured, coherent talk, with the ability to think on his feet and answer potentially tricky questions on it afterwards (if he wants to get a decent mark).  It contributes towards his GCSE qualification under the new specification, and he could be asked to reprise the performance at our school’s ‘Work-Ready Day‘ in two weeks’ time: an important shop window for pupils to get noticed by major local employers, where talent HAS been ‘spotted’ in the past.  And ‘scouted’.  Despite the fact that the students would rather eat their own tongues than do the presentation once, let alone twice …

Why am I telling you this?

Continue reading “Lend me your ears: support Drew Dzwonkowski’s ‘foolish’ side project …”

Roughly Chronological Re-read Week 1: The Two Gentlemen of Verona

I’m a “grow old disgracefully” sort of guy, but some prefer to “live fast, die young“, of course …

If you’re more Jimi than Jagger, more Buddy Holly than Bruce Springsteen, you might want to tune in to Jen’s blog, where she is looking at a play per week.  Mad as a hatter!

I think she knows her Shakespeare shit …

The Scenic Route

Date: Between 1589 and 1592.

 

First read: In 200…5, I think? At some point in my early 20s I read my Arden Complete Works cover to cover. Then I re-read it in 2011 when I worked on a couple of scenes from it at Mountview.

 

Productions seen: None – just that couple of scenes at drama school.

 

Productions worked on: As above.

 

Edition I’m using: Good old Dover Thrift.

She's just not that into you, Pro

 

Observations:

 

  • I read the play aloud with Mark and Flavia. We noticed that the locations weren’t consistent across the editions – sometimes one of us had Milano and another Verona, sometimes one had Mantua and another Padua. I wish we’d actually noted the differences, but we didn’t… What I can tell you is that I was using the Dover Thrift pictured above, Mark had the Arden Complete Works and Flavia was using the text…

View original post 527 more words